Have a super car in your driveway? Now you can get JBL’s ultra-high-end speakers in a color to match

Harman's luxury division announces a custom-finish program for its made-to-order JBL Everest and K2 loudspeakers.

JBL Everest speaker
Credit: Michael Brown

CEDIA 2015, Dallas, TX—Does your manor need a conversation piece inside to match the hundred-thousand-dollar car parked outside? Harman is here to oblige, with a new premium-finish program for its best JBL speakers, the DD6700 Everest and the K2-S9900.

You can choose from seven custom finishes, with the cabinets painted on a positive-pressure carousel using a multi-stage base coat/clear coat system. The speakers are then sanded and polished to a mirror finish. Just don’t be in a hurry: These babies are built to order, with a lead time of 120 days.

Driving a Ferrari F12berlinetta? Just think how a pair of JBL DD6700 Everest speakers in a Rossa Corsa finish would look in your media room. Perhaps a Porsche 911 Targa is more your speed. You can order the same speakers in Sapphire Blue Metallic. You can also choose from British Racing Green Metallic to go with your Jaguar F-Type R, Polar White to match your AMG E63 S Sedan, or Tungsten Silver to complement your Ford

JBL K2 speaker Michael Brown

The JBL K2-S9900 in Sapphire Blue Metallic (right) and Polar White (left). 

GT. And if you’re just a really big fan of JBL, you can order the speakers in JBL Orange.

These speakers are not inexpensive to begin with: The JBL DD6700 Everest speakers in the stock Rosewood veneer cost $75,000 a pair, or $85,000 a pair in Black Gloss. Ordering a set in one of the custom finishes rockets the price tag up to $90,000 a pair.

The K2-S9900’s, meanwhile, cost $44,000 if ordered in a stock Cherry or Black Zebrawood veneer, or $50,000 a pair in Black Gloss. A pair of K2s speakers in one of the seven custom finishes and you’ll be expected to lighten your wallet to the tune of $55,000.

This story, "Have a super car in your driveway? Now you can get JBL’s ultra-high-end speakers in a color to match" was originally published by TechHive.