7 security and privacy concerns at the polls

Despite email security issues that have dogged her campaign, respondents say Hillary Clinton is the most qualified to protect the United States from cyberattacks.

1 presidential race
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Presidential race

A recent poll by Wakefield Research delved into the psyche of the American voter asking them many questions about who will lead them through cyberspace the next four years. According to the survey, which was sponsored by PKWARE, the majority (64 percent) of registered U.S. voters believe it is likely that a 2016 presidential campaign will be hacked.

Private email of no concern
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Private email of no concern

Despite Hillary Clinton’s private email controversy, 42 percent of registered voters surveyed think she is the presidential candidate most qualified to protect the United States from cyber-attacks. She is followed by Donald Trump (24 percent), Scott Walker (18 percent) and Jeb Bush (15 percent).

Red-Blue Split
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Red-Blue Split

Registered voters are predictably very evenly split on which political party has the best policy solutions for protecting personal information, with 38 percent saying Democrats and 36 percent saying Republicans. Yet, the majority of registered Millennials (56 percent) think Democrats have the best policy solutions.

Sacrificing Privacy
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Sacrificing Privacy

In the wake of the ongoing debate over safety versus privacy, 56 percent of registered voters would be willing to allow the government to search their email, Internet browser history, phone calls and text messages if it meant protecting the U.S. from a terrorist attack.

Superpower Hackers
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Superpower Hackers

When it comes to cyber warfare, 51 percent of U.S. voters believe China to be the country with the best hackers, followed by the United States (30 percent), Russia (13 percent) and North Korea (7 percent).

Security issues
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Security issues

Improved defense against hackers (34 percent) tops the list of cybersecurity issues voters would most like to see the presidential candidates’ debate, followed by an identity protection plan for Americans (26 percent) and collaboration with private business on safeguarding the Internet (22 percent).

Encryption
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Encryption

In terms of personal cybersecurity, the majority of those polled are not taking advantage of available security tools that can best protect sensitive personal data. Only 47 percent of voters use encryption to protect their personal data, and 23 percent did not understand the meaning behind the word encryption.

Data Worries
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Data Worries

Social Security numbers (56 percent) represent the personal data that registered voters worry most about, followed by bank information (33 percent) and internet browsing history (7 percent).