More real-world oddball tech job interview questions

Cisco, Microsoft, HP and Apple put candidates through the ringer

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Oddball

After online jobs/career marketplace Glassdoor issued its annual list of Oddball Real-World Job Interview Questions we followed up to see if they had additional ones more relevant to the enterprise Network and IT companies Network World writes about. Here's what they came up with: 

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Microsoft

“Using a satellite photo, tell me how many blades of grass are in a square meter of the turf outside this building.” – Microsoft Senior Program Manager job candidate  (Redmond, Wash.).

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AT&T

“If you were to start walking right now to Los Angeles, how long would it take you (in time)?” – AT&T Associate Applications Developer job candidate (Atlanta).

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HP

“Given this pen, how would you test it?” – Hewlett-Packard Firmware Test job candidate (San Diego)

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Riverbed

“How would you check if one word is an anagram of another?” – Riverbed Technology Software Test Engineer job candidate (Sunnyvale)

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Cisco

“What kind of tree would you be?” – Cisco Senior Technical Writer job candidate (San Jose)

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Apple

“If you had to float an iPhone in mid-air, how would you do it?” – Apple Technical Program Manager job candidate (Cupertino)

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VMware

“What inspires you to get up in the morning?” – VMware Partner Program Manager job candidate (Palo Alto)

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Google

“Why do you see both sun and moon in the sky sometimes, and the moon is never full?” – Google Technical Project Manager job candidate (Mountain View)

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Verizon

“Why do you love technology?” – Verizon Product Manager job candidate (Boston)

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Broadcom

“Two trains are traveling towards each other at a certain closing speed and initial distance between them. A bird at another speed is flying from one train to another, turning around every time it reaches a train. How far does the bird fly before the trains collide?” – Broadcom Senior Principal Engineer job candidate (San Diego)