Woman who became oldest living person just last week, and then began freely dispensing 'longevity' advice, dies

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Credit: Wonderlane via Flickr

Less than a week ago, Gertrude Weaver had became the world's oldest living person and was inviting President Obama to her 117th birthday party on July 4.

Sadly, the president will have to find something else to do on Independence Day because Weaver died on Monday, just five days after succeeding her predecessor, 117-year-old Misao Okawa of Japan, as the oldest person alive.

The official cause of death was pneumonia, but perhaps hubris also should be listed on Weaver's death certificate, for she was pretty free with advice about "longevity" just a few days ago. And now look where we are.

Just kidding. She seemed like a delightful woman, and we're sure Obama would not have stood her up.

And it's not like she didn't know her way around an actuarial table: Weaver was the seventh-oldest person ever. The oldest? That was Jeanne Calment, a French woman who died in 1997 at age 122 (and 164 days).

Also, it turns out, another "oldest living person" had an even shorter reign than Weaver. Emma Tillman of Connecticut lasted only four days as the world's oldest person in 2007. But we're not changing that William Henry Harrison reference in the "eyebrow," as we say in the exciting online publishing industry.

The new world's oldest person? It's 115-year-old Jeralean Talley of Michigan.

This story, "Woman who became oldest living person just last week, and then began freely dispensing 'longevity' advice, dies" was originally published by Fritterati.

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